Microsoft Registered Partner Small Business Specialist VAT number GB 873185892 Registered company number 5440703
50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
Cornwallis House Howard’s Chase Basildon Essex SS14 3BB Covering Basildon, Southend, Shoeburyness, Brentwood, Billericay, Chelmsford, Thurrock, Lakeside and surrounding areas
Copyright 2015 DGT Technology Ltd Privacy Policy About us

How to avoid becoming a victim of spam and

phishing emails

With over 205 billion emails sent worldwide on a daily basis, it’s clear that email communication and in particular email marketing is not going away any time soon. But whilst email can be a great way of keeping abreast of the products, services and brands that are important to you - it’s also an extremely effective way for criminals to lure you into giving away personal information or worse still – your bank account details. Over the years, criminals have become masters at this lucrative activity. They’ve come a long way since the stereotypical “You’ve won the Spanish lottery” type emails of the 1990’s and are now developing sophisticated, lifelike corporate emails and even fake websites to collect your bank details and system passwords. So the big question is how do you protect yourself and your organisation from becoming a victim of these modern day con artists? Here’s a few quick tips on us… Don’t respond to emails asking for personal and/or financial information It’s very rare these days that any organisation would ask for your personal details via email. If you are convinced it’s a genuine email requesting information – DON’T click on the link in the website, but search for the company on Google, click on the link to the real website, find their number and call them up to make sure that their request is genuine. DON’T USE THE CONTACT NUMBER PROVIDED IN THE EMAIL AS THIS COULD ALSO BE FAKE Also - don’t be hastened into action by messages which incite urgency such as “Urgent – log in now, your account details may have been stolen’. Always be cautious about downloading files and opening email attachments Major companies are very unlikely to send you out an email with an attachment unless you have specifically asked for it and that’s just the same for your personal contacts or work colleagues too. Think about it, would you randomly send your best mate an “urgent” spreadsheet with no prior warning? If you receive an email with an attachment and you’re not expecting it – don’t open it. Contact the person who sent it either by phone or via a new email (don’t reply to the suspect email as this simply spreads the problem) and confirm it is what is should be. Be particularly cautious if it contains one of the following attachment types: .exe .bat .scr .zip .com DON’T GET CAUGHT OFF GUARD – Not all emails are complicated. It could be something as simple as a message saying “I’ve attached the information as requested”. THINK – did you request it? Are you expecting this information? If not – don’t open it. Implement a 5 stage checklist for all emails (i) Is your own email address in the “From” field – if so, it’s a fake (ii) If there are lots of emails in the “To” field – it’s probably a fake (iii) If the “From” field says it’s from Barclays, but the email address is something that doesn’t match – like barclays23@gmail.com – it’s definitely a fake. Why would Barclays need to send an email to you from a Gmail account?? (iv) If it’s a corporate email, check for spelling mistakes and the style of language used. Chances are that if there are spelling mistakes or if the language it a bit more formal or different then you’re used to – it’s a fake. (v) If there are links in the email that you’re encouraged to click on – hover over them and it should tell you where the link is really taking you to. If the description doesn’t match the website link it claims to be – don’t click on it. Above all - use common sense Think before you take action. Are you expecting this email? Is the email asking you to do something you would not normally do? Do you know the person that emailed you? If the email seems remotely suspicious in any way – take advice and if you know the person that sent it, call them directly. Don’t be tempted to forward the email on as this is only going to spread the potential problem. Contact your IT Support Provider After all – they’re the experts and can provide you with the most up to date information around email scams. They’ll also be able to help you with an IT security strategy to help keep your employees and your data safe. If you don’t have an IT Support Provider or if you’re unhappy with your existing supplier – why not drop us an email at info@dgt.uk.net or call us on 0208 819 1360 for a chat. A small monthly outlay for quality and proactive IT Support could save you thousands of pounds in the long run if you become victim of to an email scam. 
2016-02-23 /  Article #3
Microsoft Registered Partner Small Business Specialist VAT number GB 873185892 Registered company number 5440703
50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
Cornwallis House Howard’s Chase Basildon Essex SS14 3BB Covering Basildon, Southend, Shoeburyness, Brentwood, Billericay, Chelmsford, Thurrock, Lakeside and surrounding areas
Copyright 2015 DGT Technology Ltd Privacy Policy About us
0208 819 1360

How to avoid becoming a victim

of spam and phishing emails

With over 205 billion emails sent worldwide on a daily basis, it’s clear that email communication and in particular email marketing is not going away any time soon. But whilst email can be a great way of keeping abreast of the products, services and brands that are important to you - it’s also an extremely effective way for criminals to lure you into giving away personal information or worse still – your bank account details. Over the years, criminals have become masters at this lucrative activity. They’ve come a long way since the stereotypical “You’ve won the Spanish lottery” type emails of the 1990’s and are now developing sophisticated, lifelike corporate emails and even fake websites to collect your bank details and system passwords. So the big question is how do you protect yourself and your organisation from becoming a victim of these modern day con artists? Here’s a few quick tips on us… Don’t respond to emails asking for personal and/or financial information It’s very rare these days that any organisation would ask for your personal details via email. If you are convinced it’s a genuine email requesting information – DON’T click on the link in the website, but search for the company on Google, click on the link to the real website, find their number and call them up to make sure that their request is genuine. DON’T USE THE CONTACT NUMBER PROVIDED IN THE EMAIL AS THIS COULD ALSO BE FAKE Also - don’t be hastened into action by messages which incite urgency such as “Urgent – log in now, your account details may have been stolen’. Always be cautious about downloading files and opening email attachments Major companies are very unlikely to send you out an email with an attachment unless you have specifically asked for it and that’s just the same for your personal contacts or work colleagues too. Think about it, would you randomly send your best mate an “urgent” spreadsheet with no prior warning? If you receive an email with an attachment and you’re not expecting it – don’t open it. Contact the person who sent it either by phone or via a new email (don’t reply to the suspect email as this simply spreads the problem) and confirm it is what is should be. Be particularly cautious if it contains one of the following attachment types: .exe .bat .scr .zip .com DON’T GET CAUGHT OFF GUARD – Not all emails are complicated. It could be something as simple as a message saying “I’ve attached the information as requested”. THINK – did you request it? Are you expecting this information? If not – don’t open it. Implement a 5 stage checklist for all emails (i) Is your own email address in the “From” field – if so, it’s a fake (ii) If there are lots of emails in the “To” field – it’s probably a fake (iii) If the “From” field says it’s from Barclays, but the email address is something that doesn’t match – like barclays23@gmail.com – it’s definitely a fake. Why would Barclays need to send an email to you from a Gmail account?? (iv) If it’s a corporate email, check for spelling mistakes and the style of language used. Chances are that if there are spelling mistakes or if the language it a bit more formal or different then you’re used to – it’s a fake. (v) If there are links in the email that you’re encouraged to click on – hover over them and it should tell you where the link is really taking you to. If the description doesn’t match the website link it claims to be – don’t click on it. Above all - use common sense Think before you take action. Are you expecting this email? Is the email asking you to do something you would not normally do? Do you know the person that emailed you? If the email seems remotely suspicious in any way – take advice and if you know the person that sent it, call them directly. Don’t be tempted to forward the email on as this is only going to spread the potential problem. Contact your IT Support Provider After all – they’re the experts and can provide you with the most up to date information around email scams. They’ll also be able to help you with an IT security strategy to help keep your employees and your data safe. If you don’t have an IT Support Provider or if you’re unhappy with your existing supplier – why not drop us an email at info@dgt.uk.net or call us on 0208 819 1360 for a chat. A small monthly outlay for quality and proactive IT Support could save you thousands of pounds in the long run if you become victim of to an email scam. 

Request a callback

Your name

Phone number

Your email

Company name 

Enter the number code here
 
0208 819 1360