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50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
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Do you have one of these 5 passwords?

There were over 2.5 million cyber crime offences such as computer hacking, committed in the UK last year alone and the number of attacks increases exponentially on a daily basis. You would think then, with cyber crime being so prevalent – that we would all be extra careful when it comes to cyber security… after all – if you lived in a neighbourhood with a chronically high crime rate, you wouldn’t think of leaving the door to your house wide open or leaving your keys in the car.

12345, Qwerty, password…

Yet for some reason, the cyber security message seems to be very slow at getting through. SplashData, which collates passwords from data breaches in America and Western Europe to build samples, said "123456" was, for the fifth year running, the most common password. Qwerty also made the top 5 as did the word ‘password’, the sequence 12345678 and the sequence 12345. Other popular examples were login, welcome, football, abc123 and passw0rd.

Everyone is at risk

The sad fact is, there’s a common misconception that hacking only happens to people of importance, of significant wealth or of deep seated stupidity. Organisations are only targeted if they are government-based, incredibly large or incredibly wealthy. The reality though is that almost everyone in the country will at some time or other in their lives, be the victim of cyber crime at least once. It doesn’t matter if you’re rich or poor, if you’re a 2-man start-up or a multi-national corporate… you will be targeted and unless you make significant efforts to protect yourself – cyber criminals will be successful in getting what they want from you.

10 tips for a strong password

Having a strong password is the first basic step in protecting yourself so we’ve put together some top tips to help you choose something appropriate. 1. Make sure you use a mix of alphabetical and numeric characters 2. Password are case sensitive so use a mixture of upper and lowercase 3. If the system allows it, use symbols (spaces shouldn’t be used as some applications may trim them away) 4. Try using a short phrase with all of the vowels missing 5. Replace all the vowels in a word with symbols 6. Use the first letters of the words from the line of a song or a memorably sentence with symbols thrown in 7. Never reuse a password and don’t have the same password across all of your accounts 8. Use a password generator from a reputable source such as Norton and store them in a password safe 9. Use two-factor authentication – this is available on many apps and requires a secondary pin code which is sent via text or email. 10. Most importantly – if you go to all of the hard work of choosing a strong password, don’t go away from your computer and leave it unlocked. Poor cyber security standards in your organisation, whatever it’s size can be fatal. To learn more about how you can protect yourself and to book a free IT health check, contact DGT Technology today on 0208 819 1360.
2016-04-13 /  Article #7
Microsoft Registered Partner Small Business Specialist VAT number GB 873185892 Registered company number 5440703
50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
Cornwallis House Howard’s Chase Basildon Essex SS14 3BB Covering Basildon, Southend, Shoeburyness, Brentwood, Billericay, Chelmsford, Thurrock, Lakeside and surrounding areas
Copyright 2015 DGT Technology Ltd Privacy Policy About us
0208 819 1360

Do you have one of these 5

passwords?

There were over 2.5 million cyber crime offences such as computer hacking, committed in the UK last year alone and the number of attacks increases exponentially on a daily basis. You would think then, with cyber crime being so prevalent – that we would all be extra careful when it comes to cyber security… after all – if you lived in a neighbourhood with a chronically high crime rate, you wouldn’t think of leaving the door to your house wide open or leaving your keys in the car.

12345, Qwerty, password…

Yet for some reason, the cyber security message seems to be very slow at getting through. SplashData, which collates passwords from data breaches in America and Western Europe to build samples, said "123456" was, for the fifth year running, the most common password. Qwerty also made the top 5 as did the word ‘password’, the sequence 12345678 and the sequence 12345. Other popular examples were login, welcome, football, abc123 and passw0rd.

Everyone is at risk

The sad fact is, there’s a common misconception that hacking only happens to people of importance, of significant wealth or of deep seated stupidity. Organisations are only targeted if they are government- based, incredibly large or incredibly wealthy. The reality though is that almost everyone in the country will at some time or other in their lives, be the victim of cyber crime at least once. It doesn’t matter if you’re rich or poor, if you’re a 2-man start-up or a multi-national corporate… you will be targeted and unless you make significant efforts to protect yourself – cyber criminals will be successful in getting what they want from you.

10 tips for a strong password

Having a strong password is the first basic step in protecting yourself so we’ve put together some top tips to help you choose something appropriate. 1. Make sure you use a mix of alphabetical and numeric characters 2. Password are case sensitive so use a mixture of upper and lowercase 3. If the system allows it, use symbols (spaces shouldn’t be used as some applications may trim them away) 4. Try using a short phrase with all of the vowels missing 5. Replace all the vowels in a word with symbols 6. Use the first letters of the words from the line of a song or a memorably sentence with symbols thrown in 7. Never reuse a password and don’t have the same password across all of your accounts 8. Use a password generator from a reputable source such as Norton and store them in a password safe 9. Use two-factor authentication – this is available on many apps and requires a secondary pin code which is sent via text or email. 10. Most importantly – if you go to all of the hard work of choosing a strong password, don’t go away from your computer and leave it unlocked. Poor cyber security standards in your organisation, whatever it’s size can be fatal. To learn more about how you can protect yourself and to book a free IT health check, contact DGT Technology today on 0208 819 1360.

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