Microsoft Registered Partner Small Business Specialist VAT number GB 873185892 Registered company number 5440703
50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
Copyright 2017 DGT Technology Ltd Privacy Policy About us

Five ways to keep your tone in check when

writing business emails

Have   you   ever   received   an   e-mail   response   that   struck   you   as   the   communication equivalent   of   a   brick   being   thrown   at   you?   Have   you   felt   hurt   by   your   peer's abrupt, dismissive tone? With    the    proliferation    of    electronic    communication,    good    writing    is    now    an essential   skill   in   the   digital   age.   But   good   writing   and   basic   email   etiquette   or 'netiquette'   is   hard   to   find   in   the   business   world.   There's   often   a   big   difference between the tone you intend and the one the receiver experiences. A   study   in   the   Journal   of   Personality   and   Social   Psychology   shows   that   people misinterpret   the   meaning   and   tone   of   emails   as   much   as   50   percent   of   the   time. The    resulting    communication    gaps    often    escalate    into    misunderstandings, resentment and frustration. E-mail   communication   lacks   the   three   human   signals   that   indicate   tone.   a)   There's no   warmth   of   voice.   b)   No   body   language.   c)   No   facial   expressions.   Faced   with   a lack   of   tone,   people   often   give   your   words   the   worst   possible   tone   -   especially   if you happen to catch them when they're under stress or in a grumpy mood. 1. Choose the right words How   can   you   prevent   a   tone   gap?   Make   it   a   habit   to   add   intentional   warmth.   a) Start   with   the   person's   name.   b)   Add   a   warm   connecting   sentence   to   the   top   c) Sign off in a friendly manner with your first name. People   often   write   short   sharp   emails   if   they   are   on   the   move   with   their   mobile and   do   not   choose   the   right   words.   You   can   usually   tell   if   an   email   is   sent   from   a mobile   by   the   different   signature   footer   (or   no   signature   footer   at   all)   and   make allowances accordingly. Do   not   use   emoticons   in   a   business   email   -   they   are   only   useful   for   text   and instant messaging with people you communicate informally. 2. One subject line with one topic Business   people   receive   an   average   of   108   emails   per   day.   It   is   crucial   that   subject lines    be    concise,    specific    and    actionable    allowing    someone    to    prioritize    the message.   A   good   subject   line   summarizes   the   rest   of   the   message   and   gets   a faster response. Poor subject line: Re budget meeting Better subject line: Draft agenda re budget meeting 21 June 2016 3. No Blame You   do   not   want   to   be   the   person   in   an   email   thread   pointing   fingers   and   starting a   war   of   words.   You   can   make   use   of   passive   voice   while   referring   to   an   unhappy incident or a mistake, as it conveys the meaning with subtlety. Negative You did not submit the report this week. They failed to meet the deadline for submitting quotes. Positive The report was not submitted this week, or, I did not receive the report this week. The deadline for submitting quotes was missed.   4. Use positive phrases Avoid   using   extreme   adjectives   in   business   emails.   There   is   no   need   to   give   away emotions   or   feelings   in   business   emails   although   you   should   be   personable   and professional. Use    positive    phrases    as    much    as    possible.    Avoid    phrases    like:    It    is    really unfortunate,   I   deeply   regret   to   break   this   news,   There   is   a   huge   effort   involved,   It is too late, It is extremely urgent. Negative The problem we have at hand is… We must implement the first solution. I am unable to provide the report before Wednesday afternoon. Positive The situation we have at hand is… We prefer to implement the first solution. I will provide the report Wednesday afternoon at the earliest. 5. Pause before sending We   have   all   sent   an   email   message   that   we   regret.   Always   skim   through   your composed   email   before   hitting   send.   Think   about   what   your   reaction   would   be   to receiving   it.   Also,   check   the   recipient   list   to   ensure   your   email   is   going   to   the   right people   before   the   email   goes   out.   On   Gmail   or   on   some   internal   email   systems there is the option to “undo” or “retrieve” your email even after you have hit send. The   general   rule   of   thumb   for   staying   out   of   trouble   and   preventing   an   escalation of   emotionally   charged   emails   is   to   ask   yourself   if   you   would   you   make   the   same comment   to   someone's   face   and   wait   for   a   response?   If   not,   then   you   probably should not send that email. If   you   want   help   or   advice   on   setting   up   your   company   email   to   be   highly available,   cloud   based,   available   on   every   computer,   phone   and   tablet   then   talk   to a   member   of   the   team   here   at   DGT   Technology   today.   You   can   reach   us   on   0207 112 7550 or email info@dgt.uk.net. www.dgt.uk.net
2016-06-02 /  Article #9
Microsoft Registered Partner Small Business Specialist VAT number GB 873185892 Registered company number 5440703
50 Liverpool Street London EC2M 7PY Covering London Central, City, Docklands, London West End, Shoreditch, Stratford, Hackney, and surrounding areas.
Copyright 2015 DGT Technology Ltd Privacy Policy About us
0208 819 1360

Five ways to keep your tone in

check when writing business

emails

Have   you   ever   received   an   e-mail   response   that   struck   you as   the   communication   equivalent   of   a   brick   being   thrown at    you?    Have    you    felt    hurt    by    your    peer's    abrupt, dismissive tone? With   the   proliferation   of   electronic   communication,   good writing   is   now   an   essential   skill   in   the   digital   age.   But   good writing   and   basic   email   etiquette   or   'netiquette'   is   hard   to find   in   the   business   world.   There's   often   a   big   difference between   the   tone   you   intend   and   the   one   the   receiver experiences. A   study   in   the   Journal   of   Personality   and   Social   Psychology shows   that   people   misinterpret   the   meaning   and   tone   of emails   as   much   as   50   percent   of   the   time.   The   resulting communication         gaps         often         escalate         into misunderstandings, resentment and frustration. E-mail   communication   lacks   the   three   human   signals   that indicate   tone.   a)   There's   no   warmth   of   voice.   b)   No   body language.   c)   No   facial   expressions.   Faced   with   a   lack   of tone,   people   often   give   your   words   the   worst   possible   tone -   especially   if   you   happen   to   catch   them   when   they're under stress or in a grumpy mood. 1. Choose the right words How   can   you   prevent   a   tone   gap?   Make   it   a   habit   to   add intentional   warmth.   a)   Start   with   the   person's   name.   b) Add   a   warm   connecting   sentence   to   the   top   c)   Sign   off   in   a friendly manner with your first name. People   often   write   short   sharp   emails   if   they   are   on   the move   with   their   mobile   and   do   not   choose   the   right   words. You   can   usually   tell   if   an   email   is   sent   from   a   mobile   by   the different   signature   footer   (or   no   signature   footer   at   all) and make allowances accordingly. Do   not   use   emoticons   in   a   business   email   -   they   are   only useful   for   text   and   instant   messaging   with   people   you communicate informally. 2. One subject line with one topic Business   people   receive   an   average   of   108   emails   per   day. It   is   crucial   that   subject   lines   be   concise,   specific   and actionable   allowing   someone   to   prioritize   the   message.   A good   subject   line   summarizes   the   rest   of   the   message   and gets a faster response. Poor subject line: Re budget meeting Better   subject   line:   Draft   agenda   re   budget   meeting   21 June 2016 3. No Blame You   do   not   want   to   be   the   person   in   an   email   thread pointing   fingers   and   starting   a   war   of   words.   You   can   make use   of   passive   voice   while   referring   to   an   unhappy   incident or a mistake, as it conveys the meaning with subtlety. Negative You did not submit the report this week. They failed to meet the deadline for submitting quotes. Positive The   report   was   not   submitted   this   week,   or,   I   did   not receive the report this week. The deadline for submitting quotes was missed.   4. Use positive phrases Avoid   using   extreme   adjectives   in   business   emails.   There   is no   need   to   give   away   emotions   or   feelings   in   business emails     although     you     should     be     personable     and professional. Use   positive   phrases   as   much   as   possible.   Avoid   phrases like:   It   is   really   unfortunate,   I   deeply   regret   to   break   this news,   There   is   a   huge   effort   involved,   It   is   too   late,   It   is extremely urgent. Negative The problem we have at hand is… We must implement the first solution. I    am    unable    to    provide    the    report    before    Wednesday afternoon. Positive The situation we have at hand is… We prefer to implement the first solution. I    will    provide    the    report    Wednesday    afternoon    at    the earliest. 5. Pause before sending We   have   all   sent   an   email   message   that   we   regret.   Always skim   through   your   composed   email   before   hitting   send. Think   about   what   your   reaction   would   be   to   receiving   it. Also,   check   the   recipient   list   to   ensure   your   email   is   going to   the   right   people   before   the   email   goes   out.   On   Gmail   or on   some   internal   email   systems   there   is   the   option   to “undo”   or   “retrieve”   your   email   even   after   you   have   hit send. The   general   rule   of   thumb   for   staying   out   of   trouble   and preventing   an   escalation   of   emotionally   charged   emails   is to   ask   yourself   if   you   would   you   make   the   same   comment to   someone's   face   and   wait   for   a   response?   If   not,   then you probably should not send that email. If   you   want   help   or   advice   on   setting   up   your   company email   to   be   highly   available,   cloud   based,   available   on every   computer,   phone   and   tablet   then   talk   to   a   member of   the   team   here   at   DGT   Technology   today.   You   can   reach us on 0207 112 7550 or email info@dgt.uk.net. www.dgt.uk.net

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